What Is the Total Assets Formula?

Formula for Total Assets

Total assets formula can be defined as:

Total Assets Calculation

Assets are anything that the company owns, has economic value, and can be converted to cash.

Current assets are assets which are expected to be converted to cash within one financial year, while non-current assets are held by a company for more than one year, and are not readily convertible into cash.

Liquidity of Assets

How quickly an asset can be converted to cash or a cash equivalent is a term called liquidity.

The most liquid asset is cash itself, while non-liquid assets include things such as real estate, machinery, or land, because they cannot be converted quickly to cash.

Total Assets on a Balance Sheet

Total assets from a company are typically presented on a balance sheet, where the total assets must be equal to the sum of total liabilities and stockholders’ equity combined.

The liabilities and shareholders’ equity show how the assets of a company are financed.

Total Assets Meaning

This accounting equation ensures that a company’s balance sheet remains balanced, and is the foundation for the “double entry system” in accounting.

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What Is the Total Assets Formula FAQs

Total Assets = Non-Current Assets + Current Assets
Assets are anything that the company owns, has economic value, and can be converted to cash.
How quickly an asset can be converted to cash or a cash equivalent is a term called liquidity.
Total assets from a company are typically presented on a balance sheet, where the total assets must be equal to the sum of total liabilities and stockholders’ equity combined.
Current assets can be converted to cash within one financial year, while non-current assets are intended to be held for more than one year, and are not readily convertible into cash.

Assets Definition

Asset vs Equity vs Liability

Assets are recorded on a company’s balance sheet along with liabilities and equity.

Equity refers to the amount of money contributed by shareholders, plus retained earnings (or losses).

Liabilities are balances that effectively reduce a company’s overall spending power, such as outstanding loans or debt.

What Are Assets in Accounting?

For accounting purposes, a company’s value is equal to their assets minus their liabilities.

What Does Asset Mean Practically? A Helpful Example

When a company spends cash on an asset, the value of the “assets”section of the balance sheet remains the same.

As an example, if a company spends $10,000 in cash on a new vehicle, their cash is reduced by $10,000 but they gain an asset worth the same amount.

Before accounting for depreciation, the total value of their assets remains the same.

Assets Examples

Some examples of assets include:

  • Property, plants, and equipment (PP&E), which covers everything from heavy machinery to building space
  • Inventory
  • Investments
  • Accounts receivable
  • Cash and cash equivalents
  • Anything else that counts towards a company’s overall net worth or spending power

Personal Assets

Personal assets refers to assets owned personally by an individual. Examples would be things like a vehicle, home, savings account, equity owned, and anything else that counts towards one’s overall net worth.

As with business assets, personal assets can have varying degrees of liquidity.

Assets and Liabilities

Liabilities are essentially the opposite of an asset; they are anything that counts against a company’s overall net worth.

Examples would be debts taken on, such as by issuing bonds, wages owed, taxes owed, and so on. Liabilities are often measured against assets. If liabilities exceed assets, it indicates a financial problem.

Types of Assets

The two major types of assets are long-term and short-term assets.

Long-term assets, which may also be called fixed-assets, is anything with an economically useful life of more than one year. A short-term asset, or current asset, is anything with an economically useful life of one year or less.

List of Assets

A list of company assets can usually be found on the balance sheet. The assets may be categorized by type, such as plants, property, and equipment (PP&E), long-term investments, intangible assets, and so on.

Current Assets

Current assets, also called short-term assets, are a specific type of asset unique in the fact that they can only provide value for or within one year.

Examples would be short-term investments (that will be cashed with a year), inventory, and cash and cash equivalents.

Other Questions About Assets:

How do you define an Asset?

An asset is a resource that a company owns that provides economic value, such as cash, equipment, property, rights or anything that a company can expect to generate revenue or reduce expenses.

What are the main types of assets?

The four main types of assets are: short term assets, financial investments, fixed assets and intangible assets.

What are some examples of Assets?

Some examples of assets include: property, plants, and equipment (PP&E), which covers everything from heavy machinery to building space,
inventory, investments, accounts receivable and cash and cash equivalents

How does a Liability differ from an Asset?

Liabilities are essentially the opposite of an asset; they are anything that counts against a company’s overall net worth.

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True Tamplin, BSc, CEPF®

About the Author
True Tamplin, BSc, CEPF®

True Tamplin is a published author, public speaker, CEO of UpDigital, and founder of Finance Strategists.

True contributes to his own finance dictionary, Finance Strategists, and has spoken to various financial communities such as the CFA Institute, as well as university students like his Alma mater, Biola University, where he received a bachelor of science in business and data analytics.

To learn more about True, visit his personal website, view his author profile on Amazon, his interview on CBS, or check out his speaker profile on the CFA Institute website.